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Feathers and feminism: global street artists transform Delhi – in pictures

St+art India facilitates art in public spaces, making it accessible to a wider audience by taking it out of the gallery. The foundation’s street art festival in New Dehli has attracted artists from across the world in a rare global effort to bring murals, installations, workshops and street walks to India’s capital.

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Rukkit, from Thailand, juggles spray cans after finishing his mural at Connaught Place Photograph: Pranav Mehta. (By The Guardian)

 

Polish artist Olek enlisted 60 women from different walks of life to help her crochet this blanket on a family night shelter Photograph: Akshat Nauriyal (By The Guardian)
Polish artist Olek enlisted 60 women from different walks of life to help her crochet this blanket on a family night shelter
Photograph: Akshat Nauriyal (By The Guardian)

 

The Germany-based 1010, known for his portal-like street art illusions, says this work is inspired by ancient Hindu architecture Photograph: Pranav Mehta (By The Guardian)
The Germany-based 1010, known for his portal-like street art illusions, says this work is inspired by ancient Hindu architecture
Photograph: Pranav Mehta (By The Guardian)

 

DALeast, an artist from China, created this work after travelling across India Photograph: Akshat Nauriyal (By The Guardian)
DALeast, an artist from China, created this work after travelling across India
Photograph: Akshat Nauriyal (By The Guardian)

 

Day & Night, You & You, by the Spanish artist Okuda Photograph: Akshat Nauriyal (By The Guardian)
Day & Night, You & You, by the Spanish artist Okuda
Photograph: Akshat Nauriyal (By The Guardian)

 

Olek and a colleague work on her gigantic crochet Photograph: Akshat Nauriyal (By The Guardian)
Olek and a colleague work on her gigantic crochet
Photograph: Akshat Nauriyal (By The Guardian)
Joao Samina, from Portugal, with his artwork Photograph: Pranav Mehta (By The Guardian)
Joao Samina, from Portugal, with his artwork
Photograph: Pranav Mehta (By The Guardian)

 

Samina used a stencil technique to depict an anonymous woman on the staircase of a building Photograph: Pranav Mehta (By The Guardian)
Samina used a stencil technique to depict an anonymous woman on the staircase of a building
Photograph: Pranav Mehta (By The Guardian)
Japanese street artist Lady Aiko and her assistant examine the sketch of her mural, as curious kids gather around Photograph: Akshat Nauriyal (By The Guardian)
Japanese street artist Lady Aiko and her assistant examine the sketch of her mural, as curious kids gather around
Photograph: Akshat Nauriyal (By The Guardian)
Lady Aiko’s work at Lodhi Colony depicts Rani Lakshmibai, one of the most powerful female leaders in Indian history, as a symbol of women’s growing empowerment in the country Photograph: Akshat Nauriyal (By The Guardian)
Lady Aiko’s work at Lodhi Colony depicts Rani Lakshmibai, one of the most powerful female leaders in Indian history, as a symbol of women’s growing empowerment in the country
Photograph: Akshat Nauriyal (By The Guardian)

 

Fonte: http://www.theguardian.com

 

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